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We’re Already Living In The Future

At iUVO we’re following the rise of automation, self-powered vehicles and robotics at iUVO with a sense of deja-vu since the 70’s science fiction films have been pretty accurately predicting what’s up next for humanity.

Metropolis

From the realistic humanoid robots in Fritz Lang’s Metropolis…

BTF 2

To Back To The Future II’s wearable tech that’s not too far removed from the Oculus Rift rigs of today. I genuinely didn’t think that in my lifetime technology like Star Trek’s food replicators or Back To The Future II’s food Hydrator could be a reality, how shortsighted I was! The amount of innovation currently underway in food tech is an incredible example of how far we’ve come in such a short time.

Whether it’s printing your meals with Natural Machine’s 3D food printer Foodini, using a one stop year round whole body nutrition solution like Soylent, or eating “meat” made from plant protein from Beyond Meat, we’re already living in the future. I can now truly imagine a day where many people visit restaurants to simply scan food using devices like the pocket SCIO molecular scanner for replication at home on their food printers.

Away from food, 3D printing is also carving a niche within fashion, from sculptural, nicely bonkers haute couture of Iris Van Herpen to Electroloom’s Field Guided Fabrication machine that can replicate CAD plans to create wearable items of clothing using only one machine. On a much larger scale, the construction industry are also beginning to rally around innovation, with Chinese company Winsun printing 10 houses in 24 hours and Zaha Hadid starting to experiment, albeit initially with shoes and jewellery. For a technology that really only entered mainstream consciousness around 7 years ago, the advancements have already been vast.

Like 3D printing, drones are also shifting from PR stunt clickbait to practical uses ranging from vaccine delivery to bridge building. This video below from 2 Swiss researchers is an awe-inspiring, slightly terrifying glance at what the future might hold.